Eight Sentence Sunday #15

I present to you Eight Sentence Sunday, a blog hop hosted by Weekend Writing Warriors. I’m taking a look at some prewriting for next month’s Camp NNWM.

It was a suspicious city, one where food was prepared in front of you by robots to prove no poison was added. Yet the girls knew from experience that this suspicion did not apply to as many aspects of life as one might think. For example most would respond to a simple distraction and ignore what was in front of them. Then one might just pick it up from in front of their nose. This didn’t work on people from other places though, this was also something the girls knew from experience. Other cultures required careful planning and research before a con could be used effectively against them. Of course the research was worth it and the payouts great.

“Get ready, the truck is turning the corner.”

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Eight Sentence Sunday #13

I present to you Eight Sentence Sunday, a blog hop hosted by Weekend Writing Warriors. I’ve started another round of edits on my novel Moon Murder and found this little gem in a pile of notes.

Developing the helpful computer program was annoying, yet with her abysmal luck in assistants she had needed something to help her. She would never use a human side kick again, the computer was just too efficient and effective.

It asked all the right questions, it recorded the observations she made, and compiled a summary of facts and remaining questions once the investigation was over.

Unlike 16s arm implant it did not have a personality, just the way she wanted it. Get the job done and that’s it.

“Location recorded. Reason for investigation needed.”

“Murder.”

Check out more at http://www.wewriwa.com/

Eight Sentence Sunday #12

I present to you Eight Sentence Sunday, a blog hop hosted by Weekend Writing Warriors. Today I have some sentences from the novel I’m writing for Camp Nano. I’m running behind and the words are rough, but there are still some gems in there!

“They always need more soldiers, that’s all they ever think about.”

“Well they are trying to expand the territory.”

“You know what it really does? It increases the demand for high shelf blood. We gotta have some while it’s still at a good price!

“You are absolutely right, bloodtender two of the best blood you got!”

“Fresh?”

“Of course, the best of the best!”

Check out more at http://www.wewriwa.com/

F is for Foil (A literary device. Not aluminum foil.)

This post is a part of the A to Z Challenge. Every day (minus Sunday’s) during April in 2015 I will be making a post related to a literary device which starts with a particular letter of the alphabet. I have a general idea that these posts will be describing the same characters as they go through their lives, but I haven’t written all the posts yet so no promises!

Foil – is a character that shows qualities that are in contrast with the qualities of another character with the objective to highlight the traits of the other character. The term foil, though generally being applied for a contrasting character, may also be used for any comparison that is drawn to portray a difference between two things.

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde is an ideal example of foil since it’s simple; Jekyll’s foil is his other half Hyde. In the book the transformation between the two shows the battle between good v bad in all humans. That’s one of the main pluses of using a foil. It emphasizes one or more themes within ones story. A truly fantastic literary device when used correctly.

In my novel Moon Murder my detective character has a foil in the arm implant Genie (or G3N13). Their interactions show the constant struggles between humans and robots, the traditional v new age, and the detail oriented v the carefree. It wonderfully highlights my novels main themes, which is why every round of edits ends with me adding more interactions between these characters. As they build their relationship the story gets more meat because the themes are getting ever more engrained in the world.

E is for Epitaph

This post is a part of the A to Z Challenge. Every day (minus Sunday’s) during April in 2015 I will be making a post related to a literary device which starts with a particular letter of the alphabet. I have a general idea that these posts will be describing the same characters as they go through their lives, but I haven’t written all the posts yet so no promises!

Epitaph – is an inscription written on a grave. Generally, it is a brief composition, having figurative sense in a verse or in prose form, written to pay tribute to a deceased person, or to remember a past event.

Many people have written their own epitaphs before their deaths. I thought it would be interesting to have my characters write their own epitaph when they are 60. This forces me to think about different events from their whole life and how that will have effected their view of themselves.

Valentine (60 dog years) – “So long for now and thanks for all the bones!”

Eric – “A wall be placed, my bones erased, yet words will never save me.”

Vic – “The winds blow, and the winds change, one only needs a sail to catch them in.”

Valentine wants to wait for the rest of the family in whatever afterlife there might be. Eric feels fatalistic about the whole thing. Saying that a tombstone or more will be put above his bones with this epitaph on it, but the words aren’t going to save him from death. Vic was looking over her life when she wrote hers. She did a lot of travel and believes all one needs to do is see the winds, or wants, they have and then go after them to lead a happy life.

D is for Denotation

This post is a part of the A to Z Challenge. Every day (minus Sunday’s) during April in 2015 I will be making a post related to a literary device which starts with a particular letter of the alphabet. I have a general idea that these posts will be describing the same characters as they go through their lives, but I haven’t written all the posts yet so no promises!

I apologize for being behind. I plan to catch up now that it’s my weekend!

Denotation – generally defined as literal or dictionary meanings of a word in contrast to its connotative or associated meanings.

I figured since my last post was on connotation it made sense to have denotation, the dictionary definition of a word for this post. Many poems start with words using the dictionary definition to create a picture, then use the implication of those words to make a bigger point.

The water sparkled under the blue sky, but then a raven flew by.

The winds started, the water churned, the world was about to burn.

The water sparkling under the blue sky using denotation sets the scene, making people feel calm and peaceful. The raven is used in a connotative sense to mean something bad comes to the front. Winds will actively buffet people while moving around the water, making the whole thing less peaceful. The whole world isn’t likely to burn, but a persons world which was peaceful could suddenly have a major problem, which is what is being described here.

C is for Connotation

This post is a part of the A to Z Challenge. Every day (minus Sunday’s) during April in 2015 I will be making a post related to a literary device which starts with a particular letter of the alphabet. I have a general idea that these posts will be describing the same characters as they go through their lives, but I haven’t written all the posts yet so no promises!

I apologize for being behind. I plan to catch up now that it’s my weekend!

Connotation – refers to a meaning that is implied by a word apart from the thing which it describes explicitly. Words carry cultural and emotional associations or meanings in addition to their literal meanings or denotations. For instance, “Wall Street” literally means a street situated in Lower Manhattan but connotatively it refers to “wealth” and “power”.

Since I’m running behind and would like to catch up quickly I’m going to keep this short. A description of my character using different words with the same definition but different connotations.

Eric the college student consistently listens to music while examining his notes.

Eric the freshman always listens to rap while analyzing his notes.

Freshman is a specific level of college student which implies newer. As one who doesn’t like rap music I would look down on this, thinking the rap music to be distracting. I personally feel that analyzing sounds more action oriented than examining. The first feels like he is just looking over his notes while analyzing sounds like he wants to understand his notes.