Eight Sentence Sunday #15

I present to you Eight Sentence Sunday, a blog hop hosted by Weekend Writing Warriors. I’m taking a look at some prewriting for next month’s Camp NNWM.

It was a suspicious city, one where food was prepared in front of you by robots to prove no poison was added. Yet the girls knew from experience that this suspicion did not apply to as many aspects of life as one might think. For example most would respond to a simple distraction and ignore what was in front of them. Then one might just pick it up from in front of their nose. This didn’t work on people from other places though, this was also something the girls knew from experience. Other cultures required careful planning and research before a con could be used effectively against them. Of course the research was worth it and the payouts great.

“Get ready, the truck is turning the corner.”

Eight Sentence Sunday #14

I present to you Eight Sentence Sunday, a blog hop hosted by Weekend Writing Warriors. I’m taking a look at my novel Animal Companions from April. Many of the scenes are still rough, but they’ll get there with some polish.

“What, you got the trail of something to hunt?”

I barked a resounding yes.

“You know what you found the last time we were tracking something?”

I did remember, it ended up being a kangaroo which punched my boss in the chest with his hind legs making him breath funny for weeks. This time though it wasn’t a kangaroo, but what could it be? I jumped through the prickly brush and found myself looking at a mud pit. This was where the smell ended, though I didn’t know why, there wasn’t an animal there.

As my wise old grandma once said, “If you don’t know what to do sonny then pee on it. Always gives you an answer to your questions.” So I peed into the mud puddle, and it gave the most terrifying roar I have ever heard.

Check out more at http://www.wewriwa.com/

Eight Sentence Sunday #13

I present to you Eight Sentence Sunday, a blog hop hosted by Weekend Writing Warriors. I’ve started another round of edits on my novel Moon Murder and found this little gem in a pile of notes.

Developing the helpful computer program was annoying, yet with her abysmal luck in assistants she had needed something to help her. She would never use a human side kick again, the computer was just too efficient and effective.

It asked all the right questions, it recorded the observations she made, and compiled a summary of facts and remaining questions once the investigation was over.

Unlike 16s arm implant it did not have a personality, just the way she wanted it. Get the job done and that’s it.

“Location recorded. Reason for investigation needed.”

“Murder.”

Check out more at http://www.wewriwa.com/

Eight Sentence Sunday #12

I present to you Eight Sentence Sunday, a blog hop hosted by Weekend Writing Warriors. Today I have some sentences from the novel I’m writing for Camp Nano. I’m running behind and the words are rough, but there are still some gems in there!

“They always need more soldiers, that’s all they ever think about.”

“Well they are trying to expand the territory.”

“You know what it really does? It increases the demand for high shelf blood. We gotta have some while it’s still at a good price!

“You are absolutely right, bloodtender two of the best blood you got!”

“Fresh?”

“Of course, the best of the best!”

Check out more at http://www.wewriwa.com/

Eight Sentence Sunday #11

I present to you Eight Sentence Sunday, a blog hop hosted by Weekend Writing Warriors. Here are some sentences I cut out from an old novel of mine. I don’t like taking out perfectly good words, but sometimes a story needs to be shaken up before everything fits into place.

He started off on his shopping list, camping store first.

After walking around on the wall for a while he realized two things. First he had no idea where any of the stores he wanted to go to were. He couldn’t figure out where they were from the mall map at all. The stores were ones he had never heard of before such as FluffyBunny, NachoCheese, or MoonBeams. He didn’t even know what MoonBeams were. How did he know what they were selling there and above all which one was the camping store?

The second problem was how he was going to get off of the wall and into said stores, a grappling hook perhaps?

Check out more at http://www.wewriwa.com/

H is for Haiku

This post is a part of the A to Z Challenge. Every day (minus Sunday’s) during April in 2015 I will be making a post related to a literary device which starts with a particular letter of the alphabet. I have a general idea that these posts will be describing the same characters as they go through their lives, but I haven’t written all the posts yet so no promises!

A haiku poem has three lines, where the first and last lines have five moras, while the middle line has seven. The pattern in Japanese genre is 5-7-5. The mora is another name of a sound unit, which is like a syllable, but it is different from a syllable. As the moras cannot be translated into English, they are modified and syllables are used instead. The lines of such poems rarely rhyme with each other.

Valentine –
Thanks for the bone
I will love it forever
For it is yummy

Eric –
I wish I had a
Girlfriend to love and hold
Instead of this poem

Vic –
Travel far away
Somewhere I will want to stay
A hut in the jungle

G is for Glossation

This post is a part of the A to Z Challenge. Every day (minus Sunday’s) during April in 2015 I will be making a post related to a literary device which starts with a particular letter of the alphabet. I have a general idea that these posts will be describing the same characters as they go through their lives, but I haven’t written all the posts yet so no promises!

Gloss – As a verb, to gloss is to write a scholarly or explanatory commentary on another text. This practice was common among medieval scribes and writers, particularly those commenting on biblical texts, who would write extensive glosses in smaller handwriting in the margins of bibles. Modern editors of scholarly editions often add their own glosses to literary works in the form of footnotes. See criticus apparatus. As a noun, a gloss is the actual written commentary itself. Glossation is the act of making such commentaries.

Traditionally glossation is the act of hand writing in the margins of a novel. Yet it can be used as a literary device within ones novel to gain a new layer of depth and believability to the world. I have two stories whom use this technique with such skill that they have a permanent spot on my bookshelf.

The first is the Bartimaeus Trilogy, a story about a human who summons a djinni. The story is written by said djinni and involves comments in the margins to help explain why he did what he did or with comments on how the djinni world works. It works as a wonderful tool to understand the personality of the djinni and to explain how the world works without slowing down the action.

The second is The Way of Kings. In this novel much of the world is divided between things that men and women are allowed to do. Men aren’t supposed to read, but women are. It’s revealed that while women read out loud to the men they will also sometimes write notes in the margins for the other women who will read it in the future. Special messages for those interested in that topic. It struck me as such a wonderful little detail about the world, yet with the potential to change the entire plot! What if the meaning of those comments is nothing to most women, but then they accidentally get read out loud and then men realize they have been misinterpreting the book this entire time. Or a woman is reading two different versions of the book and one has a comment on the side which starts to unravel one of the many mysteries within this book?

Quick comment that I’m not done with The Way of Kings yet. It’s a 45 hour audio novel which I only listen to when I’m driving, so I still have a while to go. If either of those things happens I didn’t know about it!